SUMMER 2016 HUDSON – QUÉBEC CITY – HUNTINGDON – KNOWLTON – WAKEFIELD – WEST ISLAND

After a successful opening weekend in Hudson and a great Canada-day weekend in Quebec City, we’re looking forward to the rest of the summer’s events! Check out what’s coming up:

  • September 9th-11th, Wakefield: Theatre Wakefield presents Ta Da! Arts Alive! Québec, taking place at the www.CentreWakefieldLaPeche.ca. Featuring local and visiting artists such as Entrelacs, LAVINIAThe Paperback Queen, Love With Leila, The Auden Test, How Often Do I Dream …, and much more! Full details at http://www.tadafestival.ca.
  • September 24th, West IslandA full day of family fun located in the West Island community of Pointe Claire, at John Rennie Highschool, featuring kid-friendly activities and a concert from Vintage Wine. Full details can be found on the Facebook Event!

** ELAN Members receive a $5 discount on Vintage Wine tickets! Email arts.alive@quebec-elan.org for the special promo code. **

To find out more about Arts Alive! Québec, visit http://arts-alive-quebec.ca/.

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ELAN is an official minority language organization within a country that recognizes two languages as official. ELAN is located in Tiohtiak:ke, the original name for Montreal in Kanien’kéha, the language of the Mohawk—also known as Mooniyang, which is the Anishinaabeg name given to the city by the Algonquin. While we are based in this city, our projects have also taken place in many regions across Quebec.

We acknowledge the colonial origin of English and French in Canada, and recognize that both languages benefit from official status throughout the land. The province that we know as Quebec is an amalgamation of the traditional territories of the Innu and Inuit nations, Algonquian nations, as well as the Mohawk nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. Kanien’kéha and Anishinaabeg are but two of the original languages of this province; Atikamekw, Cree, Inuktitut, and Innu-aimun are also among the many Indigenous languages spoken across Quebec as majority languages, all well before French and English.

ELAN acknowledges the important work being done by First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples to revive the traditional languages of these territories, and their advocacy for the official status of Indigenous languages.