Multidisciplinary

  • ELAN Member Laura Endacott is hosting a multi-channel video installation where she invites participants on a series of walkabouts and discuss contemporary motherhood. At this stage of the project she is seeking a gay mother and a veiled mother as a means of being inclusive in her research. The filming will take place over September and October for a total time commitment of 2 hours. For more information please contact laura.endacott@sympatico.ca.

Theatre

Music

Writing

  • Submit your poetry to Vallum Issue 15.1 Forgetting by November 15. How does “Forgetting” figure in your lives and in your poems?
  •  Submit your fiction to Cosmonauts Avenue‘s 2017 fiction prize by October 31. Cosmonauts Avenue is calling for work that elevates and amplifies underrepresented voices, work that is warm, thoughtful, dark, light, devastating, funny, & necessary.

460 Sainte-Catherine West
Suites 706 & 708, 917 (Quebec Relations)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3B 1A7
Phone: (514)-935-3312
admin@quebec-elan.org

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ELAN is an official minority language organization within a country that only recognizes two languages as official. ELAN is located in Tiohtiak:ke, which is the original name for Montreal in Kanien’keha:ka, the language of the Mohawk—also known as Mooniyang, which is the Anishinaabeg name given to the city by the Algonquin. While we are based in this city, our projects have also taken place in many regions across Quebec.
We would also like to acknowledge the important work being done by First Nations to revive the traditional languages of these territories, and their advocacy for the official status of Indigenous languages. Kanien’keha:ka and Anishinaabeg are but two of the original languages of this province, in which English and French are colonial languages. The province that we know as Quebec is an amalgamation of the traditional territories of the Innu and Inuit nations, Algonquian nations, as well as the Mohawk nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. Atikamekw, Cree, Inuktitut, and Innu-aimun are also among the many Indigenous languages spoken across Quebec as majority languages, and well before French and English.