FAQ.

ELAN’s Work

What exactly does ELAN do?

ELAN serves and supports Quebec’s English-speaking artists and cultural workers– that is, Quebec’s official language minority (OLM) artistic community. ELAN does this through several avenues:

  • ELAN Events: Connecting artists at networking events, workshops, and other gatherings
  • Advocacy: Communicating the artistic community’s concerns to funders, broadcasters, government committees, and other decision makers
  • Projects: Nourishing partnerships across sectors, developing opportunities for artists’ career growth, building bridges between Quebec’s regions and linguistic communities, addressing common concerns and celebrating common ground
  • ELANews: Circulating information and promoting member activities in our free monthly email newsletter
  • Facebook, Twitter and Instagram: Sharing news and opportunities from members and community
  • Membership: Boosting ELAN members through promotion, support, and special offers

In all these avenues, ELAN’s scope is province-wide and covers all artistic disciplines, practices, and career stages. ELAN’s membership and community comprises artists from a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.

What is an official language minority?

French speakers outside Quebec and English speakers inside Quebec are considered to be official language minorities (OLM): communities of people who speak one of Canada’s two official languages, but who are in the minority insofar as the rest of the population in their region speaks the other official language. This Statistics Canada report provides more detail on the concept of OLM communities (OLMCs) and the complex definitions involved. According to the Canadian Census, Anglophones accounted for about 13.7% of the province’s population.

The Ottawa-based Fédération culturelle canadienne-française (FCCF) is ELAN’s counterpart, serving and supporting French-speaking artists outside Quebec.

What about the English Language part of ELAN?

ELAN members have in common the fact of using English in their lives, whether as part of their creative expression, their professional activities, or another domain. ELAN uses the terms English-language and English-speaking inclusively: regardless of mother tongue, anyone can be an English speaker.

ELAN encourages an evolving Quebec identity that recognizes French as the public language and celebrates social, cultural, and artistic diversity. ELAN believes Quebec’s English-speaking artists benefit from strong connections to their French-speaking colleagues and to each other.

How many English-speaking artists live in Quebec?

According to the Canadian Census, 8,500 English-speaking Quebecers work in arts and culture. More than 3000 work in film and television, 1000 in music, 800 in visual arts. Smaller numbers work in theatre, writing, publishing, media arts, dance and circus arts. Significant numbers work in fields such as animation and translation.  

Many artists work in at least two languages. ELAN’s 2010 study [Link to study in the Resources section] of workers in Film and Television revealed that 26% live in bilingual homes, 62% considered themselves fluently bilingual, and 97% were at least partially bilingual.

What does ELAN do for its members?

ELAN’s work benefits all artists and arts lovers, but goes the extra mile for members. ELAN Members get:

  • Promotion and visibility on social media (3300+ followers on Facebook, 2900+ on  Twitter and 100+ on Instagram) and in ELANews (2400+ subscribers)
  • Discounts on arts and culture stuff – 10% off at Librairie Drawn + Quarterly, anyone?
  • Guidance on funding opportunities, resources, and career development
  • Advance notice of projects, campaigns, and other opportunities to connect with fellow artists and grow their careers
  • Free, discounted, or exclusive access to ELAN workshops and paid events, like the very popular Getting Media Attention workshop with CBC Montreal
  • A Spotlight on their work in ELAN’s Membership Directory (online soon!)
  • The chance to present their work to captive audiences at regular networking events

Click here to find out more about the benefits of ELAN membership.

What kind of advocacy work does ELAN do?

ELAN regularly meets with federal institutions (e.g. the Canada Council for the Arts, Telefilm, the National Film Board), Senate committees, French-language arts organizations (e.g. CALQ, le Conseil des arts de Montréal), and other decision-makers to discuss issues relating to the arts and culture sector and official minority language communities.

This work takes place largely behind the scenes, but it produces concrete outcomes:

  • In October 2015, the National Film Board (NFB) signed a three-year cooperation and collaboration agreement to strengthen Quebec’s audiovisual sector and culture. This result was generated in collaboration with the Quebec English-Language Production Council.
  • ELAN gathered community feedback for Quebec’s 2016 Cultural Policy Review, which has gone largely unnoticed in English-speaking media.
  • 20% of Videotron’s programming on MAtv, its community television station, is devoted to English-language content – the result of years of intervention alongside community groups and artists working in the field.

Click here to find out what ELAN has been working on recently.

How do I submit an event, job call, or other item to ELANews?

If you’re a member, send an email to news@quebec-elan.org with a brief (no longer than 2 sentences!) description and link (if available).

If you’re not a member, and you have an opportunity that would benefit other artists – for example, a call for submissions, a job opportunity, or an offer to collaborate – email news@quebec-elan.org.

As for promoting exhibitions, shows, events, or books/albums/other artistic products: this is the type of thing we usually reserve as a benefit for ELAN members. To find out more about the benefits of ELAN membership, click here.

Be sure to send your posting at least 1 week before the 1st of the month to make sure your post is included!

Can I present my work at an ELAN event?

If you’re a member, sure! Many ELAN networking events feature a Minute Market, where members sign up for 60-second slots to promote a current or upcoming exhibition, show, book launch, or other project to a captive audience of artists and arts lovers.

Click here to find out about upcoming ELAN events.

Will you help me promote my album/concert/production/movie/book/exhibition?

This is the kind of thing usually reserved as a benefit for ELAN members.

To find out more about membership, click here. If you’re an ELAN member, email us at news@quebec-elan.org or tag us on Facebook (ELAN Quebec), Twitter (@ELANQuebec) or Instagram (@ELANQC).

Do you offer English classes?

No. Try getting in touch with a continuing education program like those at Concordia or McGill, or a community program like the YMCA International Language School.

Funding, Networking, and Career Development

I’m new to Quebec. Where can I go to find information on establishing myself?

  • Follow ELAN on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to ELANews (it’s free). ELAN shares as many job opportunities as possible through these channels and on our website here.
  • Consult YES Montreal’s resources for job seekers and artist-entrepreneurs.
  • Other good resources: Artère (FR) is comprehensive and covers every artistic discipline. QWF, QDF, and Culture Montréal distribute job opportunities to their members.
  • If you’re a returning student under 30, register for Young Canada Works. Many arts organizations fund temporary positions through YCW.
  • Same with Emploi-Québec’s wage subsidy program, which is open to workers at the beginning of their career. Some employers require a letter of eligibility as part of your application package, so it’s worth getting to know the program in advance.
  • Emploi-Québec also offers project grants to cultural workers under 30 through the Young Volunteers (Jeunes volontaires) program .
  • To improve your French (and your chances in the job market), look into the Francisation program or classes through CEGEPs or other continuing education institutions. There are also many Meetup groups where you can practise.
  • Get out there. Go to vernissages, panel discussions, arts organizations’ AGMs, and any other free (or paid) events you can find. See the tips on networking above for other suggestions. Networking might not get you a job instantly, but it’s a crucial part of getting to know the field

How can I meet artists working in my area/discipline? Any tips for networking?

“Networking” can be an intimidating concept, but it’s really just meeting interesting people who care about the same things you do. Here are some good ways to jump in:

  • Come to an ELAN event! Networking events are free and open to everyone, not just ELAN members.
  • Go to vernissages (exhibition openings), shows, workshops, panel discussions, and 5-à-7s (networking cocktails). Find information on events in ELANews (subscribe here), and on ELAN’s Facebook and Twitter feeds.
  • When you’re at an event, be curious and engaged. Listen carefully and ask good questions. Don’t be afraid to strike up conversations – everyone else is there to meet people, too.
  • Volunteer. Festivals, galleries, and organizations can often use a helping hand. Volunteering helps you learn about an artistic community, introduces you to fellow volunteers and artists, and often gets you into events for free.
  • Check out ELAN’s sister organizations if you’re a writer or theatre artist and want to meet people working in your discipline: the Quebec Drama Federation (QDF), the Quebec Writers’ Federation (QWF), and the Association of English-Language Publishers of Quebec (AELAQ).
  • Networking takes practice and time. Notice what works best for you, identify your challenges, and keep at it!

How can I find work in Quebec’s arts and culture sector?

  • Follow ELAN on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to ELANews (it’s free). ELAN shares as many job opportunities as possible through these channels and on our website here.
  • Consult YES Montreal’s resources for job seekers and artist-entrepreneurs.
  • Other good resources: Artère (FR) is comprehensive and covers every artistic discipline. QWF, QDF, and Culture Montréal distribute job opportunities to their members.
  • If you’re a returning student under 30, register for Young Canada Works. Many arts organizations fund temporary positions through YCW.
  • Same with Emploi-Québec’s wage subsidy program, which is open to workers at the beginning of their career. Some employers require a letter of eligibility as part of your application package, so it’s worth getting to know the program in advance.
  • Emploi-Québec also offers project grants to cultural workers under 30 through the Young Volunteers (Jeunes volontaires) program .
  • To improve your French (and your chances in the job market), look into the Francisation program or classes through CEGEPs or other continuing education institutions. There are also many Meetup groups where you can practise.
  • Get out there. Go to vernissages, panel discussions, arts organizations’ AGMs, and any other free (or paid) events you can find. See the tips on networking above for other suggestions. Networking might not get you a job instantly, but it’s a crucial part of getting to know the field

Does ELAN provide funding?

No. But we do advocate to funders and decision-makers on behalf of English-speaking artists to maintain, improve, and create opportunities for them to support their work.

Read more about ELAN’s recent advocacy work here

Do you have any grantwriting tips?

Yes! Check out the Grantwriting Resources in the Documents section.

We also host grantwriting workshops. Click here to see if we have one planned near you.

I’m looking for funding for my project and really don’t know where to start. Help?

If you’re an ELAN member, we would be happy to sit down with you to talk about your situation and offer specific suggestions. Contact us to arrange a meeting.

Otherwise, three good places to start are the Conseil des arts de Montréal (CAM), Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec (CALQ), and the Canada Council for the Arts (CCA). Look at the programs they offer. If you’re unsure whether you qualify for a particular grant, get in touch with the program officer listed to confirm your eligibility and find out whether your project is a good fit.

Or, work backwards. Find a project similar to yours in terms of discipline, scope, and artistic content. Look for a website page, poster, or other promotional material that shows which funders supported it.

Many funders publish a list of grant recipients online a certain amount of time after a grant is awarded. This is another good way to find out which grants your peers are receiving.

Where can I get money to translate my website/promo materials into French?

There are surprisingly few clear-cut ways for artists to finance translations. You can write translation into the cost of a project grant, either as a line item (if the grant allows) or as part of your promotional costs. If you’re not quite there yet, try arranging a translation trade with a French-speaking colleague or artist whose work you admire.

ELAN has been trying to solve the translation funding puzzle for a while now. Become a member or subscribe to ELANews, and you’ll be the first to know when we figure it out.

Membership

Who can be an ELAN member?

Artists and organizations of all disciplines and backgrounds are welcome to join. Those who consider themselves arts lovers are welcome to join as Friend members. 

Find out about membership categories, our Pay-What-You-Can fee structure and eligibility criteria here.

What are the benefits of membership?

Discounts, promotion, an online Spotlight showcasing your work, cheap or free workshops, and more – but most importantly, the warm fuzzy feeling of supporting ELAN’s work on behalf of Quebec’s English-speaking artists.

See the full slate of membership benefits here.

I speak English, but it’s not my mother tongue. Can I still join?

Yes! ELAN’s eligibility criteria don’t take mother tongue into account. Many ELAN members, including some of the leaders on the Board of Directors, have a mother tongue other than English.

Member Accounts and Services

How-tos for your ELAN Member Account

Log-in:

  1. Go to https://quebec-elan.org/paupress/login
  2. Enter your email and password.
  3. Click login.

First time logging in on our new website? Forgot your password?

  1. Go to http://quebec-elan.org/paupress/login
  2. Click Need A Password? beside the login button.
  3. Enter your email on the next page. Our system will send you a password reset link.
  4. Check your email and click on the link sent to you by ELAN. Check your junk and spam folders if you don’t see the email after a while.
  5. Enter your new password and click reset.
  6. Done! You can now log into your account with your new password.

Change your profile image:

As an active member, your profile image will be displayed in ELAN’s public Membership Directory.
We recommend making your profile image an image of either your artwork or yourself.

Upload a picture:

  1. Log into your account: https://www.quebec-elan.org/paupress/login
  2. Click on the circle icon beside your name.
  3. A box will pop up on the right-hand side of the screen. Click on ‘Browse’ to select the image you wish to upload.
  4. Select the image file and click ‘open’.
  5. Now you’ll be back at the first pop-up box. Click on the checkbox that says ‘Make this my profile image’. Then click ‘save’.
  6. Close the box and refresh the page to see your new profile image!
  7. Note: The image will be displayed as a circle, so make sure the important part of your image is displayed in the middle. The image will resize on its own so don’t worry about resolution.

View & edit your account informatioN:

Log into your account at http://quebec-elan.org/paupress/login
Scroll until you find the information you are looking for.
Some fields may not be edited. For example, “Renewal Date / Date de renouvellement” lists the deadline for renewing your current ELAN membership.

Other fields may be edited by clicking on them and erasing information or typing new information.
Your name, email, street address and discipline are required fields and cannot be removed.
Sensitive information is not displayed on your public profile in ELAN’s Membership Directory.
For information on which information is listed in your public profile, go to the next section.

Control the information in your public profile to appear in the ELAN member directory:

Some information is displayed by default on your public profile:

  • Artist Name
  • First Name / Last Name
  • Region
  • Website
  • Artistic Discipline(s)
  • Biography

Once logged into your account, you can make any of this information private by clicking the eye icon above the field where the text appears.
A line through the eye indicates that information will no longer be visible on your public profile.
Remember to click ‘save’ at the top right of your screen once you’re finished!
If you wish to make a field public again, click on the eye and the line will disappear.
You may also choose to display your website, Facebook, Twitter and e-mail by clicking on the
eye above them.

Click ‘save’ and you’re done!

Renew your membership:

My membership expired, can I still renew?

Yes! Inactive members may renew their memberships through the same method as above.

Logout:

Hover over your name on the black bar at the top of the screen
A drop-down menu will appear that says ‘logout’ at the bottom
Click ‘logout’


Still having trouble?

Contact membership@quebec-elan.org or call 514-935-3312 and we’ll help you out!

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